Changes in the hair growth cycle in women with non-scarring alopecia

Cover Page
  • Authors: Kubanov A.A.1,2, Gallyamova Y.A.1, Korableva O.A.3
  • Affiliations:
    1. Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
    2. State Research Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation
    3. “SM” clinic (Ltd.)
  • Issue: Vol 94, No 5 (2018)
  • Pages: 39-49
  • Section: SCIENTTIFIC RESEARCHES
  • URL: https://vestnikdv.ru/jour/article/view/438
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.25208/0042-4609-2018-94-5-39-49

Abstract


One of the key elements in the pathophysiological process of androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss is the change of hair cycle. Growth factors controlling the development and cycle of the hair follicle have thus far been established. However, the role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of alopecia remains to be revealed.

Objective. This study was aimed at investigating the expression of the VEGF, KGF, EGF and TGF-01 growth factors in women with androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss, as well as their role in the development of alopecia.

Materials and methods. 60 female patients diagnosed with telogen hair loss (30 women) and androgenetic alopecia (30 women) were observed. In order to investigate the expression of the VEGF, KGF, EGF and TGF-01 growth factors, we conducted an immunofluorescent analysis of skin samples obtained by punch biopsy (4 mm) from the frontoparietal scalp area of patients with androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss. 15 samples obtained from healthy people were used as a reference group.

Results. A change in the expression of the VEGF, KGF and TGF-01 growth factors in women with androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss was established in comparison with healthy individuals. A correlation was found between the expression of the growth factors under study, age (p ≤ 0.05), as well as the character and duration of the disease (p ≤ 0.05) in women with non-scarring alopecia. The expression of the growth factors is found to be dependent on the clinical form of alopecia (p < 0.001).

Conclusion. The VEGF growth factor is established to have the most significant effect on the development of androgenetic alopecia in women, with the KGF, TGF-01 and EGF factors being less significant as the predictors of this disorder. The VEGF growth factor is shown to affect telogen hair loss to a greater extent compared to the EGF factor. Our study confirms differences in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss in women. The findings suggest that the VEGF and KGF growth factors, as well as TGF-01 inhibitors may be used as potential pharmacological agents for treating patients suffering from androgenetic alopecia and telogen hair loss.


About the authors

A. A. Kubanov

Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation; State Research Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Email: fake@neicon.ru

Russian Federation

Alexey A. Kubanov — Dr. Sci. (Med.), Prof., Deputy Director for Research, SRC Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation; Head of Department, Department of Dermatovenereology, Mycology and Cosmetology, RMA CPE.

Barrikadnaya str., 2/1, Moscow, 123995; Korolenko str., 3, bldg 6, Moscow, 107076

Y. A. Gallyamova

Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

Email: fake@neicon.ru

Russian Federation

Yulia A. Gallyamova — Dr. Sci. (Med.), Prof., Department of Dermatovenereology, Mycology and Cosmetology.

Barrikadnaya str., 2/1, Moscow, 123995

O. A. Korableva

“SM” clinic (Ltd.)

Author for correspondence.
Email: olselezneva83@gmail.com

Russian Federation

Olga A. Korableva — Cand. Sci. (Med.), Dermatologist, Outpatient Polyclinic Department.

Lesnaya str., 57, bldg 1, Moscow, 127055

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