Fractional CO2 laser: a new therapeutic system forphotobiomodulation of skin remodeling and cytokineproduction in the course of tissue reparation

Abstract

Eighteen female patients with the signs of photoageing underwent skin rejuvenation using a fractional CO2 laser
(SmartXide DOT, DEKA M.E.L.A., Florence, Italy) with varying energy density (2.07, 2.77 and 4.15 J/cm2). Clinical efficacy
of the said laser irradiation parameters was assessed in all of the subjects, and the skin cytokine profile was studied
by using the immunohistochemistry technique based on skin tissue samples taken prior to the treatment, right after
the treatment and in 3 and 30 days. There were significant improvements in the wrinkle and skin texture condition, and
hyperpigmentation was reduced as a result of the treatment, which proves the efficacy of using the fractional CO2 laser
for the skin photorejuvenation. The technique ensures good clinical results and is distinguished by a short rehabilitation
period and excellent safety profile. In the course of the immunohistochemistry, a relation between the skin cytokine
production, reepithelization and laser irradiation density was established.

About the authors

F Prignano

P Campolmi

P Bonnan

F Ricceri

G Cannarozzo

M Troiano

T Lotti

F Prignano

Florence University

; Florence University

P Campolmi

Florence University

; Florence University

P Bonnan

Florence University

; Florence University

F Ricceri

Florence University

; Florence University

G Cannarozzo

Florence University

; Florence University

M Troiano

Florence University

; Florence University

T Lotti

Florence University

; Florence University

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Copyright (c) 2011 Prignano F., Campolmi P., Bonnan P., Ricceri F., Cannarozzo G., Troiano M., Lotti T., Prignano F., Campolmi P., Bonnan P., Ricceri F., Cannarozzo G., Troiano M., Lotti T.

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