Results of molecular and genetic research of genes ompA, ct135 and tarP C. trachomatis strains collected from patients suffering from urogenital chlamydial infection


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Abstract

The article contains results of the molecular and genetic research of genes ompA, ct135 and tarp c. trachomatis in 50 samples of clinical material containing DNA c. trachomatis from patients (women and men) from the Moscow region with the diagnosed urogenital chlamydial infection (UGCI) confirmed by PCR method. The sequencing of the gene ompA allowed to establish, that the prevailing serovar c. trachomatis in the examined selection of UGCI patients was serovar Е (48,0%); other serovars were less often (G — 18,0%, D — 14,0%; F and J — by 8%, К — 4%). The authors revealed authentic associations of the frequency of spreading of Е serovar with non-complicated clinical course of UGCI and the association of the frequency of spreading concerning rare serovars c. trachomatis (G, D, J) — with complications of UGCI in women. Significant mutations of the gene ompА in rare c. trachomatis serovars, аs well as significant mutations of genes ct135 and tarр were revealed more often is samples from women with PID. The obtained data are sufficient to make a conclusion about the possible existing relation between peculiarities of c. trachomatis genotype and the character of the clinical course of the urogenital clamidiosis.

Full Text

Результаты молекулярно-генетического исследования генов ompA, ct135 и tarP штаммов C. trachomatis, полученных от больных урогенитальной хламидииной инфекцией
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Copyright (c) 2012 PLAHOVA K.I., KOZHUSHNAYA O.S., FRIGO N.V.

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